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Beethoven - Symphony No.7 in A major op.92 - II, Allegretto
8:47

Beethoven - Symphony No.7 in A major op.92 - II, Allegretto

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  • Duration: 8:47
  • Updated: 23 Jun 2010
  • views: 3370035
videos https://wn.com/Beethoven_Symphony_No.7_In_A_Major_Op.92_Ii,_Allegretto
Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 1 en fa menor Opus 2 Nº 1. Daniel Barenboim, piano
19:18

Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 1 en fa menor Opus 2 Nº 1. Daniel Barenboim, piano

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  • Duration: 19:18
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2013
  • views: 593086
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Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827) Sonata para piano Nº 1 en fa menor Opus 2 Nº 1. [F minor/fa mineur] 1. Allegro 2. Adagio 3. Menuetto, Allegretto 4. Prestissimo Daniel Barenboim, piano. La sonata para piano n.º 1 en fa menor Opus 2 n.º 1 de Ludwig van Beethoven data de 1796 y está dedicada a Joseph Haydn. Pese a que esta inaugura su ciclo de 32 sonatas para piano, no es la más temprana. Antes de su publicación fueron compuestas las sonatas n.º 19 y n.º 20, y sus tres Sonatinas WoO 47. ---
https://wn.com/Beethoven,_Sonata_Para_Piano_Nº_1_En_Fa_Menor_Opus_2_Nº_1._Daniel_Barenboim,_Piano
Beethoven "Moonlight" Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa
6:48

Beethoven "Moonlight" Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa

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  • Duration: 6:48
  • Updated: 19 Jan 2010
  • views: 27547167
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Recording in Beethovensaal, Hannover Germany, Dec 2009. Wilhelm Kempff recorded Beethoven cycle in the very same hall. Buy Moonlight Sonata DVD http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Albert-Hall-DVD/dp/B008B11S1A/ref=pd_sim_m_h__1/280-8455980-3697964 Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall US iTunes - http://bit.ly/iTunesUSVal US Amazon - http://bit.ly/ValRAH
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Moonlight_Sonata_Op_27_2_Mov_3_Valentina_Lisitsa
L. V. Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major Op, 61 (David Oistrakh)
45:37

L. V. Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major Op, 61 (David Oistrakh)

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  • Duration: 45:37
  • Updated: 26 Apr 2012
  • views: 400816
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Ludwig Van Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major Op.61 Complete Full Concerto Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, was written in 1806. The work was premiered on 23 December 1806 in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna. Beethoven wrote the concerto for his colleague Franz Clement, a leading violinist of the day, who had earlier given him helpful advice on his opera Fidelio. The occasion was a benefit concert for Clement. However, the first printed edition (1808) was dedicated to Beethoven's friend Stephan von Breuning. It is believed that Beethoven finished the solo part so late that Clement had to sight-read part of his performance. Perhaps to express his annoyance, or to show what he could do when he had time to prepare, Clement is said to have interrupted the concerto between the first and second movements with a solo composition of his own, played on one string of the violin held upside down; however, other sources claim that he did play such a piece but only at the end of the program. The premiere was not a success, and the concerto was little performed in the following decades. The work was revived in 1844, well after Beethoven's death, with performances by the then 12-year-old violinist Joseph Joachim with the orchestra conducted by Felix Mendelssohn. Ever since, it has been one of the most important works of the violin concerto repertoire, and it is frequently performed and recorded today. Structure The work is in three movements: Allegro ma non troppo (D major) Larghetto (G major) Rondo. Allegro (D major)
https://wn.com/L._V._Beethoven_Violin_Concerto_In_D_Major_Op,_61_(David_Oistrakh)
Daniel Barenboim plays Beethoven Sonata No. 8 Op. 13 (Pathetique)
20:19

Daniel Barenboim plays Beethoven Sonata No. 8 Op. 13 (Pathetique)

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  • Duration: 20:19
  • Updated: 05 Aug 2013
  • views: 3059626
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Master of all things Beethoven, Daniel Barenboim breathes fresh life into the timeless Pathetique Sonata. With a rare combination of artistic prowess and erudite knowledge, Barenboim demonstrates a deep understanding of this music that can be simultaneously appreciated on both a cerebral and emotional level. I. Grave -- Allegro di molto e con brio 0:19 II. Adagio cantabile 9:46 III. Rondo: Allegro 15:11 The posting of this video meets the requirements of Fair Use. I do not own any copyright licenses for this video nor do I stand to gain financially from it's posting in any way whatsoever. This video has been posted for educational purposes to incite commentary, criticism and analysis. I strongly encourage all viewers to buy this fantastic DVD collection which includes performances by Daniel Barenboim of all 32 Beethoven Sonatas by following this link: http://www.amazon.com/Barenboim-Beethoven-Complete-Sonatas-Berlin/dp/B000KWZ7VU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1375724619&sr=8-2&keywords=barenboim+on+beethoven
https://wn.com/Daniel_Barenboim_Plays_Beethoven_Sonata_No._8_Op._13_(Pathetique)
AmericanStringQuartet- Beethoven op.131
38:52

AmericanStringQuartet- Beethoven op.131

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  • Duration: 38:52
  • Updated: 05 Feb 2013
  • views: 442514
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American String Quartet, Beethoven op.131. Live at Tel Aviv Museum, January 2013 Filmed by Gilad Shabani-Shoofan, (Gilad and Mazal Photographers http:menatworkblog.tumblr.com) Violin- Peter Winograd, Laurie Carney Viola - Dan Avshalomov Cello - Wolfram Koessel
https://wn.com/Americanstringquartet_Beethoven_Op.131
Beethoven: Sonata No.4 in Eb Major, Op.7 (Korstick, Lewis)
59:45

Beethoven: Sonata No.4 in Eb Major, Op.7 (Korstick, Lewis)

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  • Duration: 59:45
  • Updated: 03 Nov 2017
  • views: 24781
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If you had to name 2 sonatas to demonstrate B.’s mastery of the classical large-scale sonata, they would be this one and the Op.22 – both sonatas which are overlooked because, while original, they don’t have the sort of brazen, goggle-inducing originality we have come to associate with B. In fact, there are some ways in which the Op.7 is less tuneful and pianistic than its three brilliant predecessors, or even the Op.22 – but only because the Op.7 demonstrates B. for first time running right up against the limits of the classical sonata and feeling a bit unfulfilled or restless, imagining possibilities beyond what the instrument and form could achieve at the time. For a start, Mvt 1 isn’t really written for the piano – it has become almost an archetype of orchestral writing for piano, with elements like an repeated Eb in the brass and themes (so, so many of them!) composed mostly of scales and arpeggios rather than melody over accompaniment. Mvt 2, with all its long pregnant pauses and high woodwinds (and an impossible crescendo written over a single held chord), has an orchestral feel but also a rather late-B. solemnity to it, and counts as one of the most moving things B. ever wrote. Mvt 3 is neither a proper scherzo nor minuet (it’s tuneful like the latter, but also playful and abruptly dramatic in the manner of the former), and B. coyly writes only “Allegro” at its beginning and “Minore” at the middle section. Mvt 4 is where the orchestral manner dies away fully, but neither is it a conventional rondo: there is a surprising amount of continuous motivic development and internal logic here, a wonderful “floating” passage at the end where a Bb ascends to a B, signalling a shift from Eb to E(!), and a coda whose feeling of warmth and generousness disguises the fact that it’s a modification of the stormy second episode. MVT I, Allegro molto e con brio EXPOSITION 00:00 – Theme Group 1, Theme 1. The opening figure in the RH (G-Eb) is M1 00:15 – TG1, T2 (imitative scales) 00:22 – Transition, using M1 00:30 – Dominant preparation 00:37 – TG2, T1 00:53 – TG2, T2. The opening legato figure is developed vigorously, eventually broken into descending quavers that lead into a diminished 7th that resolves abruptly into C 01:14 – TG2, T3 01:41 – TG2, T4, over tonic pedal coloured by minor 9th 01:57 – TG2, T5 (cadential theme) DEVELOPMENT 04:12 – M1 on V of (ii) 04:16 – TG1, T2, moving into F min 04:27 – TG2, T5, eventually reduced to just its rhythm 04:42 – M1 in A min, with a new ominous figure following. Moves into D min. M1 then announces the aug 6th chord, which also happens to be the dominant of Eb. RECAPITULATION 05:02 – TG1. T1 is now diverted into subdominant at 5:16, and a modified version of T2 follows 05:32 – TG2 CODA 06:58 – TG1, T1 07:08 – TG2, T2, eventually descending in bass 07:23 – TG2, T5 07:35 – Final cadence, using M1, but now the accent, where it was “wrongly” placed on M1’s first chord, has been shifted to the second. MVT II, Lento con gran espressione 07:49 – Theme. Note the extensive use of dramatic pauses 10:41 – Middle Episode 13:37 – Theme 16:20 – Coda (with elements of recapitulation), using theme from Middle Episode which diverges quickly into a sequence. At 16:50, tonic-dominant swing, developing dotted figure from 2nd bar of the theme. At 17:20, new cadential theme is introduced, after which bass descends chromatically while the Theme above closes. MVT III, Allegro 18:10 – Scherzo, which continuously recycles motifs from its first 4 bars’ RH. (See 18:23, the middle strain, 19:29). The return of the first strain moves into B maj, surprising harmonic territory. 20:46 – Trio. At 21:31, codetta, ending with a rare ppp mark 21:41 – Scherzo MVT IV, Poco allegretto e grazioso 23:00 – Theme, containing M2 at 23:17 (demisemiquaver arpeggio, then Eb-D tail) 23:33 – Transition, using M1. The tail of M2 is developed and isolated, turning eventually into another figure in the bass at 23:48, and dominating the texture that follows. 24:09 – Episode 1 24:35 – Theme 25:03 – Episode 2. The LH accompaniment (which eventually reaches the RH) and the initial RH chordal theme constitute M3 and M4 respectively. 26:41 – Theme 27:14 – Transition into (ii) instead of the earlier (vi) 27:52 – Episode 1 28:16 – Theme 28:44 – Coda. Home dominant raises a semitone (beautifully and misleadingly mimicking the transition into Episode 2 at 24:59) and then the main theme enters in E. The 3rd bar of the theme is repeated, ushering in a remarkable modulation back into Eb. At 29:06 Episode 2 is recalled, with M3 in the LH softened into arpeggios, while M4 in the RH develops into a gorgeous closing melody. The final bars contain an allusion to the tail of M2.
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Sonata_No.4_In_Eb_Major,_Op.7_(Korstick,_Lewis)
Beethoven Tempest Sonata No. 17, Opus 31 No. 2 in D minor, Allegretto by Tzvi Erez
7:15

Beethoven Tempest Sonata No. 17, Opus 31 No. 2 in D minor, Allegretto by Tzvi Erez

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  • Duration: 7:15
  • Updated: 06 May 2009
  • views: 597906
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Buy Now on iTunes: http://smarturl.it/BeethovenSonatas Tzvi Erez plays Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 17, Opus 31 No. 2 in D minor, Allegretto. Recorded on a 1912 Bosendorfer in February 2000. Beethoven's Piano Works. P & C 2001 Niv Classical. http://www.nivmusic.com Advertising without the permission of the copyright holder is Strictly Prohibited.
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Tempest_Sonata_No._17,_Opus_31_No._2_In_D_Minor,_Allegretto_By_Tzvi_Erez
Ludwig van Beethoven - String Quartet No. 14, Op. 131
38:52

Ludwig van Beethoven - String Quartet No. 14, Op. 131

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  • Duration: 38:52
  • Updated: 20 Sep 2015
  • views: 280588
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- Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven (17 December 1770 -- 26 March 1827) - Performers: Takács Quartet - Year of recording: 2003 String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131, written in 1826. 00:00 - 1. Adagio ma non troppo e molto espressivo 08:03 - 2. Allegro molto vivace 11:00 - 3. Allegro moderato 11:43 - 4. Andante ma non troppo e molto cantabile 25:10 - 5. Presto 30:12 - 6. Adagio quasi un poco andante 32:30 - 7. Allegro Despite its opus number, this quartet came after the "Fifteenth" Op. 132 from 1825, one of three composed to meet a commission from Prince Nikolai Golitzin. The others were Nos. 12 and 13. Like the Thirteenth and Fifteenth, this C sharp minor Quartet consists of more than the usual three or four movements. There are, in fact, seven movements to this massive work, and its form, as one might suspect, is also most unusual. - The quartet begins with a fugue, marked Adagio ma non troppo e molto espressivo. The mood throughout is somber, but with a religiosity and tenderness that seem to suggest the composer's sense of his own mortality (Beethoven died in March 1827, a year after this composition). Near the end of this movement the music fades, then leads directly into... - the second movement, marked Allegro molto vivace, which seems as if it could be a more typical first movement. It begins at a pianissimo level with a theme that might seem more suited to a Rondo finale. A transitional theme appears next, and eventually we arrive at a second subject. The material is reprised but afterward there follows no actual development section. Instead, an expanded coda develops the transitional theme. At this juncture, the traditional sonata-allegro form seems obscured. - The third movement begins without pause, and actually serves as a brief interlude to... - the long slow movement, which is marked Andante ma non troppo e molto cantabile. It consists of a theme and six variations, most of which involve harmony rather than the essence of the melody itself. This movement is one of the most profound and complex Beethoven ever fashioned in the chamber genre. Each variation is played in a different tempo, thus creating a true "variety" that, to some ears, may seem at first to impart a disjointed quality. Yet, Beethoven's invention and cleverness are present everywhere. The fifth variation, for instance, with its deftly-wrought syncopation, is wonderfully mysterious and the coda slyly starts off as if it will become yet another variation, but it subtly returns to the main themes, then brings the movement to a close with a gentle fade. - The Presto fifth movement is brimming with energy and charm. It is an attractive, humorous Scherzo with a trio section and may be, despite a few innovative touches by Beethoven, the most traditional of the movements comprising this quartet. Its rather abrupt and harsh ending leads to a brief interlude-like Adagio quasi un poco andante. - The sixth movement, like the third, is very brief. - The finale begins with a gruff theme, that is immediately followed by a less fierce but darker theme. A third melody is introduced shortly afterward, closer in character to the last, but expressing sadness and melancholy. The themes reappear, with the form thus far seeming to suggest the movement could be a Rondo. But Beethoven veers toward thematic development, as if to say he has finally found his way to the sonata-allegro form. There follows a recapitulation but with many highly imaginative changes in the previous material. A powerful and tragic coda closes what many consider Beethoven's greatest quartet. It was first published in Mainz in 1827 and was dedicated to Baron Joseph von Stutterheim.
https://wn.com/Ludwig_Van_Beethoven_String_Quartet_No._14,_Op._131
Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata (FULL)
15:00

Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata (FULL)

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  • Duration: 15:00
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2010
  • views: 105584015
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Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata (FULL) - Piano Sonata No. 14 http://www.facebook.com/9Beethoven https://twitter.com/YtAndrearomano6 The Piano Sonata No. 14 in C♯ minor "Quasi una fantasia", op. 27, No. 2, by Ludwig van Beethoven The sonata has three movements: 1 mvt: Adagio sostenuto. 2 mvt: Allegretto (click to go at 6:00 min). 3 mvt: Presto agitato (click to go at 8:05 min). Adagio sostenuto The first movement, in C♯ minor, is written in an approximate truncated sonata form. The movement opens with an octave in the left hand and a triplet figuration in the right. A melody that Hector Berlioz called a "lamentation", mostly by the right hand, is played against an accompanying ostinato triplet rhythm, simultaneously played by the right hand. The movement is played pianissimo or "very quietly", and the loudest it gets is mezzo forte or "moderately loud". The adagio sostenuto has made a powerful impression on many listeners; for instance, Berlioz said of it that it "is one of those poems that human language does not know how to qualify. The work was very popular in Beethoven's day, to the point of exasperating the composer himself, who remarked to Carl Czerny, "Surely I've written better things. Allegretto The second movement is a relatively conventional scherzo and trio, a moment of relative calm written in D-flat major, the enharmonic equivalent of C♯ major, the more easily-notated parallel major of C♯ minor. Franz Liszt described the second movement as "a flower between two chasms."[citation needed] The slight majority of the movement is in piano, but a handful of sforzandos and forte-pianos helps to maintain the movement's cheerful disposition. Presto agitato The stormy final movement (C♯ minor), in sonata form, is the weightiest of the three, reflecting an experiment of Beethoven's (also carried out in the companion sonata, Opus 27, No. 1 and later on in Opus 101) placement of the most important movement of the sonata last. The writing has many fast arpeggios and strongly accented notes, and an effective performance demands lively and skillful playing. It is thought that the C-sharp minor sonata, particularly the third movement, was the inspiration for Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu, which manifests the key relationships of the sonata's three movements. Of the final movement, Charles Rosen has written "it is the most unbridled in its representation of emotion. Even today, two hundred years later, its ferocity is astonishing. Beethoven's heavy use of sforzando notes, together with just a few strategically located fortissimo passages, creates the sense of a very powerful sound in spite of the predominance of piano markings throughout. Within this turbulent sonata-allegro, there are two main themes, with a variety of variation techniques utilized. Beethoven's pedal mark See also: Piano history and musical performance, Mute (music), and Piano pedals#Beethoven and pedals At the opening of the work, Beethoven included a written direction that the sustain pedal should be depressed for the entire duration of the first movement. The Italian reads: "Si deve suonare tutto questo pezzo delicatissimamente e senza sordino". ("One must play this whole piece [meaning "movement"] very delicately and without dampers.") The modern piano has a much longer sustain time than the instruments of Beethoven's day, leaving for a rather blurry and dissonant tone. One option for dealing with this problem is to perform the work on a restored or replicated piano of the kind Beethoven knew. Proponents of historically informed performance using such pianos have found it feasible to perform the work respecting Beethoven's original direction.
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Moonlight_Sonata_(Full)
Beethoven: Sonata "Pathetique" Op. 13 - I. Grave. Allegro di molto e con brio
8:33

Beethoven: Sonata "Pathetique" Op. 13 - I. Grave. Allegro di molto e con brio

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  • Duration: 8:33
  • Updated: 17 Aug 2010
  • views: 1930414
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Annie Fischer, piano Beethoven: Piano Sonata "Pathetique" no. 8 in c minor Op. 13 I. Grave. Allegro di molto e con brio http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqvBJc9IovI II. Adagio cantabile http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCL5sHzlDOI III. Rondo. Allegro http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ifj8dwuAzAQ
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Sonata_Pathetique_Op._13_I._Grave._Allegro_Di_Molto_E_Con_Brio
Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)
26:16

Beethoven - Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)

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  • Duration: 26:16
  • Updated: 09 May 2012
  • views: 1049661
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00:00 - Allegro, ma non tanto 12:28 - Scherzo. Allegro molto 17:44 - Adagio cantabile - Allegro vivace Paul Tortelier, cello Eric Heidsieck, piano 1972
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Cello_Sonata_No._3_In_A_Major,_Op._69_(Paul_Tortelier_Eric_Heidsieck)
Ludwig van Beethoven - String Quartet No. 16, Op. 135
24:35

Ludwig van Beethoven - String Quartet No. 16, Op. 135

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  • Duration: 24:35
  • Updated: 20 Sep 2015
  • views: 91155
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- Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven (17 December 1770 -- 26 March 1827) - Performers: Alban Berg Quartett - Year of recording: 1981 String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op. 135, written in 1826. 00:00 - I. Allegretto 06:22 - II. Vivace [Scherzo] 09:50 - III. Lento assai e cantante tranquillo 17:39 - IV. Grave ma non troppo tratto - Allegro ("Der schwer gefasste Entschluss") Beethoven wrote the bulk of this, his final quartet, in a two-month burst of activity amid health problems and shortly after his nephew Karl attempted to commit suicide. But there's not a hint of self-pity or anguish in this compact, good-natured work. For Beethoven's valedictory composition, this quartet is surprisingly small-scaled, finding inspiration in the quartets of Beethoven's one-time teacher Haydn. - The first movement, Allegretto, takes standard sonata form. Its principal theme in 2/4 hints at a march; this, the light textures, and Beethoven's reliance on very short phrases give the movement a playful nature that is emphasized by Beethoven's abrupt melodic and harmonic shifts and frequent interruptions in mid-phrase. - Beethoven carries this unpredictability over to the second movement, Vivace, which is a scherzo and trio. Again, the overall format is traditional, but the movement abounds in rhythmic asymmetry disrupting the basic 3/4 meter, as well as suddenly modulating chromatic harmonies and melodies being gagged at inopportune moments. It's one of the most comic creations in Beethoven's chamber music. - In deep contrast is the slow movement, Lento assai cantante e tranquillo. This is a D flat major theme with four variations; variety and development come more through harmonic coloring than motivic manipulation. The second variation slips into a dark C sharp minor, the only spot in this work where listeners obsessed with music as autobiography might find a reflection of Beethoven's troubled life. The third variation returns to the major key for a quiet treatment of the theme in canon between the first violin and cello, and the fourth toys with rhythmic details without disrupting the music's serenity. - The finale initially seems to be a great, tragic utterance; Beethoven casts the introduction, Grave ma non troppo tratto, in F minor. At the head of the score Beethoven has written, in German, "The difficult decision," and next to the tempo indication are the words "Muss es sein?" (Must it be?). The cello and viola seem to be asking that question in the introduction, but soon the music breaks into an F major Allegro; here, Beethoven has written "Es muss sein!" (It must be!). Those three syllables form the rhythmic basis of the main theme, and seem to be inspired by an exchange between Beethoven and a friend regarding payment of money. The movement proceeds according to sonata structure, spirits remaining high right through the whimsical pizzicato passage that leads to the affirmative final bars.
https://wn.com/Ludwig_Van_Beethoven_String_Quartet_No._16,_Op._135
Daniel Barenboim: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major Op. 15
40:13

Daniel Barenboim: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major Op. 15

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  • Duration: 40:13
  • Updated: 12 Apr 2015
  • views: 437054
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From the Klavierfestival Ruhr in the Jahrhunderthalle Bochum Daniel Barenboim, soloist and conductor Staatskapelle Berlin 0:50 I. Allegro con brio (15:51) 17:03 II. Largo (12:07) 29:11 III. Rondo. Allegro scherzando (10:58) In time for his 65th birthday in 2007, Daniel Barenboim has completed a cycle of Beethoven's piano concertos. Recorded live at the prestigious Klavier-Festival Ruhr in May 2007, this recording reflects both a very individual and special reading of Beethoven’s music and the artist’s life-long dedication to the composer. Daniel Barenboim is one of the most prolific and high-profile artists performing on international stages today and Beethoven’s masterpieces have been a key part of his repertoire throughout his career, both as conductor and as pianist. Beethoven himself was a keyboard virtuoso of almost awesome abilities who created a sensation wherever he played. It is no wonder, therefore, that the piano was central to Beethoven’s overall output. Daniel Barenboim, artistic personality and former wunderkind, long an essential part of the international musical scene both on the conductor’s podium and at the piano, is the perfect match for this demanding music. Conducting and playing at the same time, Barenboim chose his orchestra of almost two decades, the Staatskapelle Berlin, which he has praised warmly for its exceptional, dark and warm sound. With a tradition reaching back to 1570, the Staatskapelle Berlin is one of the oldest orchestras in the world. Barenboim plays Beethoven brings together two musical masterminds. Daniel Barenboim Daniel Barenboim was born in Buenos Aires in 1942. He received his first piano lessons at the age of five, and was first taught by his mother. Later, he studied under his father, who would remain his only piano teacher. He gave his first public concert when he was seven. In 1952, he moved with his parents to Israel. At age eleven, Daniel Barenboim took part in conducting classes in Salzburg under Igor Markevitch. In that summer, he also met Wilhelm Furtwängler and played for him. Furtwängler then wrote, "The eleven-year-old Daniel Barenboim is a phenomenon." In 1955 and 1956 Barenboim studied harmony and composition with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. At age ten, Daniel Barenboim gave his international début performance as a solo pianist in Vienna and Rome; Paris (1955), London (1956) and New York (1957) then followed, where he played with Leopold Stokowski. Since then, he has regularly toured Europa and the United States, but also South America, Australia and the Far East. In 1954 Daniel Barenboim began his recording career as a pianist. In the 1960s he recorded Beethoven's piano concertos with Otto Klemperer, Brahms piano concertos with Sir John Barbirolli and all the Mozart piano concertos with the English Chamber Orchestra, this time serving both as pianist and conductor. Ever since his conducting début in 1967 in London with the Philharmonia Orchestra, Daniel Barenboim has been in great demand with leading orchestras around the world. Between 1975 and 1989 he was chief conductor of the Orchestre da Paris, where he often programmed contemporary works by composers such as Lutostawski, Beria, Boulez, Henze, Dutilleux and Takemitsu. Daniel Barenboim gave his début as an opera conductor at the Edinburgh Festival in 1973 with Mozart's Don Giovanni. In 1981 he conducted for the first time in Bayreuth, where he would conduct every summer tor eighteen years, until 1999. From 1991 until June 2006 Daniel Barenboim was Music Director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. The musicians of the orchestra have since named him Honorary Conductor for Life. In 1992, he became General Music Director of the Staatsoper Unter den Linden, where he was also Artistic Director from 1992 to August 2002. In 2000 the Staatskapelle Berlin voted him Chief Conductor tor Life. In 1999 Daniel Barenboim founded together with the Palestinian literary scholar Edward Said the West-Eastern Divan Workshop, which brings together young musicians from Israel and the Arab countries every summer to play music together. In summer 2005, the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra presented in the Palestinian city of Ramallah a concert of historical significance. For his music making es well as for his commitment to peace, tolerance and understanding in the world, Daniel Barenboim has been honoured with rnany an award.
https://wn.com/Daniel_Barenboim_Beethoven_Piano_Concerto_No._1_In_C_Major_Op._15
Krystian Zimerman - Beethoven - Piano Concerto No 4 in G major, Op 58
35:12

Krystian Zimerman - Beethoven - Piano Concerto No 4 in G major, Op 58

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  • Duration: 35:12
  • Updated: 27 Sep 2013
  • views: 496947
videos https://wn.com/Krystian_Zimerman_Beethoven_Piano_Concerto_No_4_In_G_Major,_Op_58
Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 2 No. 1 [Complete] (Piano Solo)
18:01

Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 2 No. 1 [Complete] (Piano Solo)

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  • Duration: 18:01
  • Updated: 20 Dec 2012
  • views: 593749
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Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1, was written in 1795 and dedicated to Joseph Haydn. It is the first piano sonata written by Beethoven. A typical performance of the entire work lasts about 17-20 minutes. Performed by Daniel Baranboim. The sonata is in four movements: 0:00 1. Allegro in F minor 3:53 2. Adagio in F major 9:16 3. Menuetto - Allegretto in F minor 13:00 4. Prestissimo in F minor Sorry for that. I don't know why the video and the audio is not match after uploaded on YouTube :(
https://wn.com/Ludwig_Van_Beethoven_Piano_Sonata_No._1,_Op._2_No._1_Complete_(Piano_Solo)
Daniel Barenboim: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73
44:41

Daniel Barenboim: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73

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  • Duration: 44:41
  • Updated: 16 Apr 2015
  • views: 1096451
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From the Klavierfestival Ruhr in the Jahrhunderthalle Bochum Daniel Barenboim, soloist and conductor Staatskapelle Berlin 0:00 I. Allegro (21:09) 21:00 II. Adagio un poco moto (8:09) 29:17 III. Rondo. Allegro (12:04) The world of music initially reacted less enthusiastically to Beethoven's Fifth Piano Concerto in E-flat Major, Op. 73. "The excessive length of the composition", wrote one reviewer, following the work's first public performance at a Gewandhaus concert in Leipzig on 28 November 1811, "reduced the overall effect that this glorious product of the composer's mind would undoubtedly otherwise have produced." On the one hand, the critic was not entirely wrong, for the Fifth Piano Concerto is Beethoven's longest piano concerto, and in its heroic "Eroica" key of E fiat major is certainly a "glorious product of the composer's mind". But with the best will in the world it is impossible to claim that it falls to produce an "overall effect". Quite the opposite, in fact. The Fifth is the most effective of Beethoven's five piano concertos and one of the most popular of all contributions to the medium. Outside the German-speaking world the work's special status is acknowledged by descriptions of it as the "Emperor", "L'Empéreur" and "Imperatore". This alternative name was not Beethoven's but probably derives from his friend and publisher Johann Baptist Cramer. In spite of its inauthenticity, it goes straight to the heart of the matter, for no piano concerto begins on a more majestic or a more resplendent note. Three times the full orchestra intones a radiant chord and three times the solo piano responds with a bravura cadenza before the orchestra introduces the main theme. At the climax of the development section, orchestra and solo instrument engage in a veritable battle fought out over harshly dotted rhythms from which they emerge as equals. And even in the soloist's cadenza, the orchestra refuses to fall completely silent but engages in a subtle dialogue with the piano. In none of his other piano concertos was Beethoven as successful in forging a novel synthesis between concertante writing and the gestural language of the symphony.
https://wn.com/Daniel_Barenboim_Beethoven_Piano_Concerto_No._5_In_E_Flat_Major_Op._73
Ludwig van Beethoven, Sonata op.2, No.1. (1st M-Competition)
16:43

Ludwig van Beethoven, Sonata op.2, No.1. (1st M-Competition)

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  • Duration: 16:43
  • Updated: 02 Apr 2016
  • views: 26659
videos
https://wn.com/Ludwig_Van_Beethoven,_Sonata_Op.2,_No.1._(1St_M_Competition)
Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 23 "Appassionata", Op. 57 [Complete] (Piano Solo)
25:28

Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 23 "Appassionata", Op. 57 [Complete] (Piano Solo)

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  • Duration: 25:28
  • Updated: 19 Dec 2012
  • views: 746295
videos
Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 (colloquially known as the Appassionata) is a piano sonata. The sonata, in F minor, consists of three movements: 0:00 1. Allegro assai 11:05 2. Andante con moto 17:34 3. Allegro ma non troppo - Presto Among the three famous piano sonatas of his middle period (the others being the Waldstein, Op. 53 and Les Adieux, Op. 81a). It was composed during 1804 and 1805, and perhaps 1806, and was dedicated to Count Franz von Brunswick. The first edition was published in February 1807 in Vienna. Performed by Emil Gilels.
https://wn.com/Ludwig_Van_Beethoven_Piano_Sonata_No._23_Appassionata_,_Op._57_Complete_(Piano_Solo)
Beethoven String Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131
39:24

Beethoven String Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131

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  • Duration: 39:24
  • Updated: 23 Aug 2016
  • views: 28558
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Beethoven: String Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131 Performed by: The Danish String Quartet (Frederik Øland, Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello) Filmed live in Alice Tully Hall, New York City February 21, 2016
https://wn.com/Beethoven_String_Quartet_In_C_Sharp_Minor,_Op._131
Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker
51:19

Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

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  • Duration: 51:19
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2012
  • views: 369635
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Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55),Berliner Philharmoniker Symphony Numer Three Eroica By Beethoven also known as the Eroica (Italian for "heroic"), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer's "middle-period," a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor. The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805. Instrumentation The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings. Form The piece consists of four movements: Allegro con brio Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor Scherzo: Allegro vivace Finale: Allegro molto The performance time is about 50 minutes.
https://wn.com/Beethoven_Symphony_No._3_In_E_Flat_Major_(Op._55)_Eroica_Berliner_Philharmoniker
Martha Argerich plays Beethoven : Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Opus  15
35:53

Martha Argerich plays Beethoven : Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Opus 15

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  • Duration: 35:53
  • Updated: 01 Jul 2014
  • views: 166893
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Ludwig van Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Opus 15 I. Allegro con brio 0:50 II. Largo 15:00 III. Rondo. Allegro scherzando 26:03 Martha Argerich, piano : Emmanuel Krivine, conductor : Chamber Orchestra of Europe
https://wn.com/Martha_Argerich_Plays_Beethoven_Piano_Concerto_No._1_In_C_Major,_Opus_15
Beethoven - Symphony No 7 in A major, Op 92  - II, Allegretto
9:27

Beethoven - Symphony No 7 in A major, Op 92 - II, Allegretto

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  • Duration: 9:27
  • Updated: 28 May 2016
  • views: 120572
videos https://wn.com/Beethoven_Symphony_No_7_In_A_Major,_Op_92_Ii,_Allegretto